Four Characteristics of The New Consumer Marketing

赖彩云 Jessy Lai Chai Yun-inbound-marketing-strategy
[vc_row type=”in_container” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]The Rise of Millennials and The Demise of Conventional Marketing: Four Characteristics of The New Consumer Marketing

Readers of this blog, how many of you are born in the 80s? Why do I ask? This article is precisely about the consumer behaviours of people born between 1980-2000.

Consumer behaviour is an important part in marketing. In 2000, American academicians David Lewis and Darren Bridger wrote The Soul of The New Consumer. In it, they coined the term “new consumer”. They argued that the new generation of consumers has a desire to participate in the production of consumables, and they are highly aware of the market. In all that they purchase, they have a high expectation. They lack trust, time, and attention span—a group that is vastly different from conventional consumers who are driven by convenience.

In simple terms, new consumers have a value system that is disparate from their predecessors. They are born in the age of internet, love the pursuit of new things, are highly unpredictable, love challenging authorities and choose to self define through various ways.

In fact, this is supported by research. According to studies conducted internationally, people born in the 80s are now gradually transitioning to the peak of their income levels. They are currently the main targets of marketing strategies.

This also means that conventional marketing is no longer appropriate. Understanding new consumers is now the focal point in marketing studies.

I am feeling the impact of new consumers in a profound way. In recent years, I have been working hard with my team to cater to this new market.

According to renowned Taiwanese consultancy DDG, corporations need to adapt to to four new kinds of mentality to keep up:

Firstly, videos work better than words

This is the digital age. Millennials interact with the world in a way that is much more active and multi-dimensional. They are used to digitisation, and are constantly connected to the rest of the world.

This makes them highly active and have shorter attention spans. Only strong stimuli that engage with many senses are able to get their attention. Due to this, Facebook and Twitter have largely upgraded their video-hosting abilities to cater to millennials.

Videos are also an important way through which millennials connect with each other. Every minute, there are about 300 hours worth of content uploaded onto YouTube. Millennials are also moving to use devices such as GoPro, which allows them to film parts of their lives and share with the world.

Do you know what this means? This means all brands and business need to be somewhat connected to the net and the social media. Or else, it would be impossible to survive in the long term.

Secondly, sharing is better than owning

Compared to the previous generation, millennials place much lesser value on material wealth and the concept of “owning” things. They believe in the power of “openness”. Only when we work together and share the benefits, can we truly maximise our potential.

This characteristic is what made the sharing economy, with fast-rising companies such as Airbnb, Uber and Kickstarter. All these platforms depend on a huge user base to thrive. Some participants provide their services, while others rent or buy them. The more people are involved, the stronger these platforms become.

In the sharing economy, good things get promoted due to good reviews, and similarly, bad products are quickly eliminated. User reviews have become a huge asset to the brands—consumers are just as willing to give good reviews as they are to give bad ones. In other words, if your brand does not deliver, it will be highly affected. If your products or services are of good quality, it will continue to thrive.

Thirdly, instead of luxury brands, new consumers seek unique experiences:

Born in a time of economic stability and wealth, millennials are normalised to the presence of luxury brands. Their consumer expectations are no longer confined to symbols of status and wealth, but the unique experience they get through consuming. They are willing to pay more for special, rare activities.

For example, the K-pop craze recently meant that many fans in Malaysia were willing to pay a fortune for a close encounter with their Korean idols. Fighting to get a ticket has become a norm for the youths.

Unique experiences are also seeping into our everyday lives. The market is increasingly adept at creating products that allows for DIY processes. Such items include bread-maker, soy milk maker and even home brewing DIY kits. This shows the high premium that millennials place on the depth of experience and closer connections with the products they consume.

Fourthly, health as a lifestyle

Millennials highly values health, and this is largely due to influences of their family and environment. They are eager to try out all kinds of services and products that make their lives healthier, and often share their experiences online.

In Malaysia for example, boxing, running, yoga and other fitness programmes are become highly popular. This is a reflection of the lifestyle that Millennials love and do not hesitate to promote.

The consumer market also shows trends of becoming younger. Young consumers are starting to exercise more conscience in their spending, resisting abusive and unsafe business practices. Health and fitness brands need to capitalise on young consumers as such.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]千禧世代崛起,传统行销OUT!了解新消费群4大特质

长期关注我的部落格的朋友们,有多少位是80年次诞生的?为何我重点提起80年代诞生的朋友呢?因为本篇文章就是要探讨1980-2000年之间诞生的千禧时代的消费形态。

消费者形态是市场行销里非常重要的一环,2000年,美国学者戴维·刘易斯(David Lewis)和达瑞恩·布里格(Darren Bridger )在其专著《新消费者理念》(The soul of the new consumer)中首次提出了“新消费者”的专有名词。他们认为,新消费者是独立而个性化的消费态度,希望参与生产和销售的愿望以及对市场的紧密关注结合在一起的群体,对所购买产品和服务具有强烈的真实可靠要求。他们缺乏信任感、时间、注意力,与遵奉固有消费模式、受便利性驱使的旧消费者有着巨大的差异。

简单而言,新消费者的价值观与上一代的旧消费者迥然不同,因为出生他们诞生于网络时代,天生喜爱追求新事物,喜好更为流动难测,并且勇于挑战权威,乐于尝试不同的方式来定义自我。

这样的看法已经得到了研究的证明,根据国际研究显示, 1980年后出生的人逐渐迈入收入高峰期,成为了下一个重要的消费客群。

这也就意味着,传统的行销策略开始行不通了,为了迎合新消费群的口味,重点研究与开发新消费群的心态已经是行销市场最新的焦点。

而我已经深刻的感受到这股新的消费力量已然来临,所以近年来不断地与团队进行研发与改进,希望能与千禧时代的消费群接轨,赢得青睐。

根据台​​湾知名的顾问公司美商方策顾问公司(DDG)的调查显示,要迎合千禧世代的消费模式,企业必须更新4项思维:

 特质一:影片比文字更能吸引他们注意

数位科技年代来临,千禧世代接触世界的方式较上个世代变得更为立体丰富而且动态。他们习惯数位生活,喜欢依照情境的不同而切换不同的装置,随时与世界保持无缝接轨状态。

千禧族群拥有跳跃与低注意力的特质,使到媒介内容变得更为视觉化与动态化,只有十足的感官冲击力才能吸引到千禧族群的目光。有鉴于此,Facebook、Twitter在近年内不断加大视频功能,正是为了回应千禧世代的此种注意力短缺的特质。

而动态影音也是千禧世代注重的沟通方式,因为如此YouTube平均每分钟新增影片长度高达300小时,千禧世代开始大量使用GoPro这种能拍出临场感以及生活片段的的摄影装置。

各位知道这意味什么吗?所有品牌经营者都必需成为某种程度上的媒体经营者,也就是加入社交媒体、熟悉所有新新时代会接触的媒介,否则自身的品牌很难逃消失的困境。

特质二:分享比拥有更快乐,追求真实的口碑

相较于上一世代汲汲一生追求各种物质与社会成就——汽车、房子、地位,千禧世代从来不把快乐与「拥有」画上等号;他们相信唯有「开放」才能带来力量,要先舍得分享,才能换来一加一大于二的结果。

千禧世代的这股特性,促成了近几年「共享经济」的快速崛起,从Airbnb、Uber、到Kickstarter,他们都是依托庞大的用户群体而运作,有人提供产品或服务,有人回应或参与,平台上的节点愈多、讯息愈活跃,愈能够为每一位平台使用者带来价值。

在共享经济的模式中,好的东西能够因为分享的机制而被快速凸显,但不好的东西也不可能久留,因为用户评价已经成为品牌资产的一部份,他们乐于给品牌掌声,也从不吝于揭露不好的使用经验,正面评价的积累与传播足以左右品牌的存活。简单而言,你的品牌一旦使用度不好,经由年轻人的强力分享下,将会受到严重的抨击,若正好是优良品牌,将会带来无限商机。

特质三:相较于购买名牌,更追求独特体验

出生于相对富裕的年代,千禧世代的成长过程充斥各种品牌的选择,他们对于消费的期待再也不仅止于获取象征符号(身份、阶级),而是藉由消费的过程获得「体验」,亲身经历一些独特、稀有的活动,并且舍得为此付出较高的价格。

例如近年来的娱乐圈大吹寒风,许多韩星都会来马开演唱会,许多“韩迷”都会为了把握唯一一次与偶像近距离接触的机会,不惜票价昂贵,也要争的一票。于是抢票对年轻人而言已是常态,着足证明消费者对娱乐的需求已经转向“独特的体验”

体验的追求也开始往私人领域渗透,市面上出现许多诉求「自制体验」的商品,从面包机、豆浆机等功能创新的生活电器,到自行酿制酒类的DIY Kit,在在显示出千禧世代对于体验的深度有着更多追求,并且期待与日常生活有着更为紧密的结合。

特质四:视“健康”为生活风格

千禧世代对于健康的重视,是受家庭教育与社会环境影响而日渐形成,他们往往很自然地将健康视为生活形态的一部份,喜欢尝试各种能够让健康生活更为丰富的产品与服务,并且乐于在网路上分享箇中经验。

例如近年来大马非常流行拳击、慢跑活动、健身、瑜伽等健康运动,就是一种自我认同与新型的生活谢太的写照,并极力在网络平台上宣传这样的生活形态,广受年轻人的喜爱。

而有机商店的数量与类型与日俱增,消费年龄层更有往下延伸的趋势,正是因为年轻族群开始有意识地选择有机商品,对抗充满不安全的食品消费环境。

运动与健康食品品牌该注重的就是年轻时代这样的消费形态。

资料参考:

http://www.managertoday.com.tw/columns/view/51782

http://wiki.mbalib.com/zh-tw/%E6%B6%88%E8%B4%B9%E8%80%85%E5%BF%83%E7%90%86

http://www.managertoday.com.tw/columns/view/51782

 

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